Software: April 2009 Archives

 

April 18, 2009

It's conference submission time ( EVT/WOTE 2009) and along with conference submission time comes its friend, fighting with LaTeX time. The big problems I usually have are avoiding bad breaks and convincing LaTeX's broken float algorithm to put my figures (I like figures) where I want them instead of three pages later. Anyway, I recently ran into a problem (on a friends paper, not my own) with a long author list. What we wanted was to have an author list with a separate affiliation list and then a footnoted contact address, like so (click to see a PDF):

LaTeX's built-in \author mode is pretty lame, but Authblk lets you use "author block" mode, with separate author names and affiliations and footnote-style superscripted numbers to connect the two. The code you want is:

\author[1,2]{Charles Kinbote}
\author[1]{John Shade}
\author[1]{Charles Xavier Vseslav}
\author[3]{Humbert Humbert}
\author[4]{Clare Quilty}


\affil[1]{Kingdom of Zembla}
\affil[2]{Wordsmith College}
\affil[3]{Independent}
\affil[4]{Beardsley Women's College}

But this is only a partial solution because it doesn't give you the footnote with the author's address. If you're willing to have the author's address attached to the affiliation block, you can just do a separate affiliation that contains the email address of the author:

\author[1,2,*]{Charles Kinbote}
\author[1]{John Shade}
\author[1]{Charles Xavier Vseslav}
\author[3]{Humbert Humbert}
\author[4]{Clare Quilty}


\affil[1]{Kingdom of Zembla}
\affil[2]{Wordsmith College}
\affil[3]{Independent}
\affil[4]{Beardsley Women's College}
\affil[*]{To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: \url{kinbote@example.com}}

This does work, but it looks pretty terrible. You can attach a footnote to the author's name as a footnote, but this isn't quite what you want either, for two reasons. First, the asterisk shows up after the name, before the superscripted affiliation numbers, when you really want it afterwards. Second, it's on the baseline of the affiliation numbers, when you really want it aligned with the top of the numbers.

What you need is a combination strategy: you use the fake affiliation with an asterisk, but don't provide a \affil block. This just creates a bare asterisk superscript, but no footnote. To create the footnote, you need to use \footnotetext. Unfortunately, if you just use \footnotetext, you end up with a numeric marker attached to the footnote text at the bottom of the page. What you want is an asterisk. To get this to work, you need to override the footnote style with \renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\fnsymbol{footnote}}, and then reset it so that you get numeric footnotes elsewhere:

\let\oldthefootnote\thefootnote
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\fnsymbol{footnote}}
\footnotetext[1]{To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: \url{kinbote@example.com}}
\let\thefootnote\oldthefootnote

Putting it all together:


\author[1,2,*]{Charles Kinbote}
\author[1]{John Shade}
\author[1]{Charles Xavier Vseslav}
\author[3]{Humbert Humbert}
\author[4]{Clare Quilty}


\affil[1]{Kingdom of Zembla}
\affil[2]{Wordsmith College}
\affil[3]{Independent}
\affil[4]{Beardsley Women's College}

\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{document}
\maketitle
\thispagestyle{empty}

\let\oldthefootnote\thefootnote
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\fnsymbol{footnote}}
\footnotetext[1]{To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: \url{kinbote@example.com}}
\let\thefootnote\oldthefootnote

Have fun.

Acknowledgement: Body text from the Lorem Ipsum Generator.

 

April 12, 2009

I was talking to Allan Schiffman tonight and he observed that computers are something like two orders of magnitude faster than when he worked on Smalltalk. In fact, it's probably more than that: the computer I had in college was, I think, an 80286, which had a maximum clock speed of 25 MHz [and this in an era where Dell advertised a similar machine as "fast enough to burn the sand off a desert floor"]. I'm typing this on a 1.6 GHz Core Duo (yes, yes, I know clock speed isn't everything, but it's close enough for these purposes). Storage has improved even more: I remember paying $1000+ for a 1GB hard drive and now terabyte drives go for about $100. That's all great, but surely you've noticed that the end-to-end performance of systems hasn't improved anywhere near as much. In fact, the UI on my Air is distinctly less zippy than that of X11 systems circa 1995.

There are of course plenty of places to point the finger: GUI chrome, code bloat, more use of interpreted and translated languages like Java, Flash, and it's true that the systems just do a lot more than they used to, but those are just symptoms. I suspect the underlying cause is something more akin to risk homeostasis. When engineers get more compute power, they spend less time worrying about how to make systems faster and a lot more time worrying about how to add more features, so the overall performance of the system stays somewhere in the "barely acceptable" range. Friends and I used to joke that engineers should be given old, slow machines to work on so that they would be incentivized to think about performance. I'm still not sure that's entirely crazy, though I must admit that it's a lot less fun to be an engineer under those conditions.

 

April 1, 2009

I'm experimentally trying using a task management app—not planning to do any sort of GTD thing, just looking for a little technical help with keeping track of all the crap I have to do. The general consensus seems to be for either Things or OmniFocus. and somewhat arbitrarily I selected Things: it's cheaper and seems a bit simpler to use. So far it's working fine, and I figured it was time to buy the iPhone app that goes along with it (OF has this as well).

Here's where things start to go off the rails. Once you have the iPhone app, you want it to sync up with the app on your computer: otherwise you have two disjoint systems, which is pretty useless. Unfortunately, it seemms that third party apps apparently can't sync with your computer the way that Apple apps sync, so the vendors need to come up with some hacky network-based scheme. Things' version seems to rely on Bonjour discovery and OF uses a WebDAV server. I don't really want to set up a WebDAV server somewhere and I'm way too paranoid to want to have random apps on my machine talking to random other computers on my network; that's why I have a firewall, after all. So, the bottom line is I'm hosed. A little bit of web searching quickly reveals hordes of people complaining about this (indeed, at least one of the early hits is about Things).

As far as I can tell, this is a basic limitation of the iPhone, but it's not clear to me if it's something Apple really doesn't want you to do or they just haven't gotten around to offering it yet. In either case, it's not very convenient.