More on vampires

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While we're on the topic of vampires... The central plot driver of Blade is Deacon Frost's plan to turn himself into the "blood god" who will somehow turn anyone in his path into vampires. Frankly, this is a pretty stupid plan, since it's kind of unclear why it would be useful to turn everyone into a vampire. What would they eat?

In a deleted scene, Dr. Karen Jenson (the female lead) makes this point and Frost shows her his incubator full of brainless corpses being used as blood production machines. This makes it a much less stupid plan. As I pointed out earlier, once you have a ready source of blood, vampirism becomes a sort of mild inconvenience, consisting of staying indoors at night and avoiding garlic pizza. Obviously it's uncool to turn people into vampires without their consent, but it's somewhere short of killing everyone and feasting on their blood. On the other hand, it's kind of unclear why it's in a vampire's interest for everyone else to be a vampire. Isn't the cool part of being a vampire having an edge over everyone else...

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Staying indoors would happen during daylight hours, not at night.

Mystery author Charlaine Harris wrote a series of books based on a similar concept: immediately after the invention of a synthetic blood substitute, vampires announced their existence to the news media ("came out of the coffin"). Now they buy various brands of blood at bars and 7-Elevens.

If I'm not mistaken, a very central part of the vampire myth was that vampires had voluntarily given up their souls--that is, had embraced evil--and by selfishly nourishing themselves with the blood of others, were also callously turning their victims into evil, soulless "undead", as well. This, far more than their need for blood--which, after all, could easily have been met with (donated or paid) blood extractions, even back in the heyday of the legend--was the reason why vampires were always considered synonymous with evil.

In our current, relatively non-religious age, however, the belief that the eternal soul is the source of human goodness is much less widely held, and we can therefore imagine vampires not as selfish, rapacious soul-stealers, but rather as mere medical patients seeking life-saving plasma.

(Completing the analogy between soul-stealing vampires and sexually promiscuous STD/AIDS patients is left as an exercise for the reader.)

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